Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation

Yadvinder Malhi, ATBC president-elect and many ATBC members are among the authors of the special issue of Philosophical Transactions B entitled Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation compiled and edited by Catherine L Parr and Caroline ER Lehmann (Royal Society Publishing) . This content can be accessed at http://bit.ly/PTB1703 and the articles can be accessed directly at http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1703

A print version is also available at the special price of £35.00. You can order online via the above web page (enter special code TB 1703 when prompted) or, alternatively, you can contact debbie.vaughan@royalsociety.org.

Congrats to authors and editors!

 

Understanding the drivers of Southeast Asian biodiversity loss

Alice C. Hughes, new 2017-2019 ATBC Councilor and a multitask member of many committees and initiatives at ATBC, just published a new article. The article is open access and can be found that the link below:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/ecs2.1624/full#ecs21624-bib-0032

Congrats Alice!

 

Carbon recovery dynamics following disturbance by selective logging in Amazonian forests

Congrats to Marielos Peña-Claros (ATBC President elect) and several other ATBC members who just published a new article. Below goes the abstract and link to the article. 

Abstract

When 2 Mha of Amazonian forests are disturbed by selective logging each year, more than 90 Tg of carbon (C) is emitted to the atmosphere. Emissions are then counterbalanced by forest regrowth. With an original modelling approach, calibrated on a network of 133 permanent forest plots (175 ha total) across Amazonia, we link regional differences in climate, soil and initial biomass with survivors’ and recruits’ C fluxes to provide Amazon-wide predictions of post-logging C recovery. We show that net aboveground C recovery over 10 years is higher in the Guiana Shield and in the west (21{plus minus}3 MgC ha-1) than in the south (12{plus minus}3 MgC ha-1) where environmental stress is high (low rainfall, high seasonality). We highlight the key role of survivors in the forest regrowth and elaborate a comprehensive map of post-disturbance C recovery potential in Amazonia.

https://elifesciences.org/content/5/e21394/article-data

 

Sustainable Development and Conservation in Borneo: Lessons from Research

Dr. Bill Laurance, ATBC long time member, published a commentary this week at the Journal Forests about Sustainable Development and Conservation in Borneo. You can download the entire commentary at: http://www.mdpi.com/1999-4907/7/12/314.

The Figure 1 on his commentary (below) shows a very impressive image of the island of Borneo. Areas in pink have had high rates of native-forest loss (2000–2015), areas in red are oil palm or wood-pulp plantations (2015), and areas in green have high aboveground biomass of native trees (image and data from Global Forest Watch).


African development corridors intersect key protected areas

Dr. Bill Laurance, ATBC long time member, with Sean Sloan and Bastian Bertzky recently published an important article about development corridors intersecting key protected areas in Africa. Its preview can be accessed at this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aje.12377/abstract

 

Natural regeneration of tree species in the Eastern Amazon: Short-term responses after reduced-impact logging

Congratulations to the ATBC President Elect Dr. Marielos Peña-Claros and colleagues for the new article: Natural regeneration of tree species in the Eastern Amazon: Short-term responses after reduced-impact logging. Here is the link to access it: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112716310842

Biodiversity and human well-being: an essential link for sustainable development

ATBC restless Director Dr. Robin Chazdon and colleagues just published the new article: Biodiversity and human well-being: an essential link for sustainable development. Here is the link to access it: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1844/20162091

 

Are seed size and seed consumer identity important determinants of seed fate in northeastern Gabon?

Cooper Rosin and John Poulsen at the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University published a new article on Biotropica: Telemetric tracking of scatterhoarding and seed fate in a Central African forest. They experimentally assessed the initial steps of seed fate for two tree species—the large-seeded Pentaclethra macrophylla and the relatively small-seeded Gambeya lacourtiana—in northeastern Gabon. The article early view is available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/…/10.1111/btp.12410/full.

 

African oil bean Pentaclethra macrophylla. Proto credit: Fundación Tierra Ibérica (http://www.inaturalist.org/photos/1509891)

Study examines 18-year natural regeneration data in Costa Rica

Dr. Vanessa Boukili (source: Earthwatch.org)

Dr. Vanessa Boukili (source: Earthwatch.org)

Congratulations to the ATBC members Vanessa K. Boukili and  Robin L. Chazdon (also ATBC Executive Director) for their new article. They examine community assembly patterns of canopy trees and palms during natural regeneration using functional trait measurements and annual vegetation dynamics data over 18 years from six second-growth and two old-growth forest stands in northeast Costa Rica.  To see what they found, please check at this link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1433831916301433. Congrats Drs. Boukili and Chazdon!

 

How mammalian predation contributes to tropical tree community structure

Congrats for the long time ATBC members Timothy Paine, Harald Beck and John Terborgh for their new article on Ecology about how mammalian predation contributes to tropical tree community structure: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecy.1586/full

Zooming in the Henri Rousseau painting "The Dream", 1910.

Zooming in the Henri Rousseau painting “The Dream”, 1910.